Author Archives: dbayleyshc

Cape Cod Baseball: The First Team Was In Sandwich

The Cape Cod Baseball League is recognized as the country’s most prestigious amateur baseball league. The rosters of all ten teams are stocked with the top college players from programs across the nation, many of whom are top MLB prospects … Continue reading

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Sandwich, Seals and Sandwiches

The Name “Sandwich” Sandwich, Massachusetts is named for the seaport of Sandwich, Kent, England. The name “Sandwich” comes from Old English (O.E.) Sandwic, and literally means “sand village,” “sandy place,” or “place on the sand.” The old English wic is … Continue reading

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Parson’s Walk

Did you know there is a town-owned pathway from the Library parking lot through the woods all the way to School Street? It is called “Parson’s Walk” or “Parson’s Way.” The MACRIS Form on file with the Massachusetts Historical Commission … Continue reading

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Dodge Macknight

Dodge Macknight (1860-1950) was regarded by many of his contemporaries as America’s first modernist. His connection to Sandwich starts with John H. Foster (1853 – 1935). In Sandwich: A Cape Cod Town, historian Russell Lovell writes about Foster: “Born in … Continue reading

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A Bit About the Boardwalk

The Sandwich Boardwalk (sometimes called the “Plank Walk”) is about 1350 feet in length and crosses Mill Creek and the marsh, leading to the Town Beach on Cape Cod Bay. Originally constructed in 1875 by Gustavus Howland (1822 – 1905), … Continue reading

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Glass Town Cultural District

 New Glass Town Cultural District Website  A note from The GTCD Planning Group: In October, Sandwich’s Glass Town Cultural District (GTCD) was designated through a vote of the Massachusetts Cultural Council. We join 13 other districts state wide in this … Continue reading

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Main Street: Then and Now & A Bit About W. E. Boyden

A Bit About W. E. Boyden William Ellis Boyden was born in 1807. He ran the Plymouth/Sandwich Stage coach operation starting in 1822. After the Cape Cod Branch Railroad came to town in 1848, he formed the Cape Cod Express … Continue reading

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The Nye Museum, Old County Road and Cedarville

The Nye Grist Mill, Homestead and Grange Hall This year marks the 50th year of Nye Association ownership (actual preservation) and the 40th year being open as a museum. In 1665 the Town of Sandwich gave 12 acres in East … Continue reading

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Sandwich’s Woodshed Night Club and the Locust Grove Asylum

Skunks and racoons on the kitchen table? The house at 238 Route 6A, The Old King’s Highway, is falling down.  It’s open to the weather and the rain just pours in. In a year or so, it may be gone. … Continue reading

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The 1885 Sand Hill School/Clark-Haddad Memorial Building

  The area around the Boston and Sandwich Glass Company in Sandwich became known as Jarvesville, named after the factory’s founder, Deming Jarves. As the number of glass factory workers grew, the company built housing for them as well as … Continue reading

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A Brickyard in Sandwich (as we mark the bicentennial of the War of 1812)

In the area known as Town Neck, along the shore of Cape Cod Bay, a lens of fine clay suitable for brick-making was discovered, perhaps as early as 1790 when construction of houses and mills picked up in earnest. Russell … Continue reading

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Aerial Views of Town Center

4 – Sandwich Card & Tag Co. 5 – G. Howland’s Lumber Yard 6 – Town Hall 7 – Sandwich Casino 8 – High School 10 – Sandwich Academy 14 – Novelty Block 15 – Central House 16 – Post … Continue reading

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Town Hall Through the Years

(Compiled by Don Bayley) In this John Warner Barber drawing from 1839, Town Hall, built in 1834, is prominently displayed. From Sandwich historian Russell Lovell: “This is the only view found showing the early Calvinistic chapel on the site of the … Continue reading

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The Story of the “Old Titus” Clock

In 1749, Reverend Abraham Williams became pastor at the First Parish Meeting House, bringing with him a 19-year old black slave named Titus Winchester.  There are two versions of the “Titus” legend. One is that Rev. Williams offered his slave … Continue reading

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Saddle and Pillion Graves

Edmund Freeman, one of the Ten Men from Saugus and the founder of Sandwich is buried here with his wife Elizabeth. Freeman settled on his homestead about a mile and a quarter east of the present Town Hall on the sloping … Continue reading

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